Filed under : Editors Choice

Seniors seek adventure in Mountain Village, Alaska

 

Mountain Village, elevation 16 feet, is the 4th largest city in Wade Hampton Census Area, Alaska, located on the mighty Yukon River near the Yukon-Kuskokwim Delta with a population of 813 hearty residents in 211 housing units. Mountain Village is 20 miles west of St. Mary’s, a small Eskimo-Yup’ik village of approximately 700 inhabitants that manages to keep a relatively low profile and seldom does it make the urban newspapers. Cities near Mountain Village include Pitkas Point, St. Marys and Wade Hampton. The seasonal economy is based on fishing and subsistence. There are few full-time jobs, with the majority of employers being the City, school district, government, and native corporation. The Zip Code is 99632.

 

The history books tell us that Mountain Village was first established with the opening of a general store way back in 1908. Prior to that it had only been a summer fishing camp. Local lore attributes the founding of Mountain Village to a Yup’ik man by the name of Chekohak. The original name of the village was Asa’carsarmiut, which means “beginning of the mountains to the north and to the south,” a reference to the 500 ft Azachorok Mountain that the village sits at the base of. This mountain, though nowhere near as massive as anything in the Alaska Range, was the first mountain encountered by those traveling up the lower Yukon River. Here you find adventure. As Helen Keller puts so very well. “Life is either a daring adventure or nothing.” That’s life in and around Mountain Village.

 

So when do we set our GPS for a pleasant visit to Mountain Village. The climate is primarily continental with temperatures that range from -44 to 80 °F and an annual precipitation of about 16 inches, with snowfall of 44 inches. The village is accessible by riverboat or barge from mid-June to October, and has summer road access to Pitka’s Point, Andreafsky and St. Mary’s. Might was to check the weather before you arrive and perhaps take along some warm garments.

 

After the village was established in 1908, residents of Liberty Landing and Johnny’s Place immigrated to the area and a Covenant Church missionary school was built. In 1923, a post office was built, and since it was a fishing village, a salmon saltery was opened in 1956 and a cannery in 1964. Today the village is home to the Stivers, who are part of the Lower Yukon School District. Scenic beauty abounds in all directions.  It is known as well as a highly diversified city.

 

I feel that it is always nice to get a second opinion of folks who have been to a site and Jana has that for us. She outlines her journey as a new teacher to a Yu’pik Eskimo village on the Yukon River near the Bering Sea with some neat photos. That’s one dedicated educator folks. Her blog archive is loaded with lots of personal experiences including a moose hunting adventure. It was a little scary when she elaborates on an experience that she labels “Frozen Eyeballs.” That’s what can happen on a snowmobile and one does not wear good googles and the precipitation is high.  Enough of that stuff.

 

Topix notes that modern conveniences like cellphones and the Internet increasingly make living in rural Alaska less rural and decidedly more intriguing. With small villages scattered across the largest state connected by frozen roads and air travel, Alaskans are innovative in many ways. You will have a fine collection of photos of the town and area all around Mountain View upon your return back home. You will feel welcomed in Mountain View, Alaska I discovered that you can take a Party Bus in Mountain Village that you wish to check out. Sounds like a real blast to me.

 

So visit with your travel agent and make plans for an adventure in Alaska, one must keep it straight as their are cities with the same name in Arkansas and Colorado as well.  Yes, you can fly into Mountain Village and here are several hotels. The airport [PAMO], is 2 miles NE of the town. Expedia can help you with a car rental. If you are “up for a travel bucket adventure,” Mountain Village awaits your arrival.  Enjoy your trip. -jeb

Seniors seek adventure in Mountain Village, Alaska

 

Mountain Village, elevation 16 feet, is the 4th largest city in Wade Hampton Census Area, Alaska, located on the mighty Yukon River near the Yukon-Kuskokwim Delta with a population of 813 hearty residents in 211 housing units. Mountain Village is 20 miles west of St. Mary’s, a small Eskimo-Yup’ik village of approximately 700 inhabitants that manages to keep a relatively low profile and seldom does it make the urban newspapers. Cities near Mountain Village include Pitkas Point, St. Marys and Wade Hampton. The seasonal economy is based on fishing and subsistence. There are few full-time jobs, with the majority of employers being the City, school district, government, and native corporation. The Zip Code is 99632.

 

The history books tell us that Mountain Village was first established with the opening of a general store way back in 1908. Prior to that it had only been a summer fishing camp. Local lore attributes the founding of Mountain Village to a Yup’ik man by the name of Chekohak. The original name of the village was Asa’carsarmiut, which means “beginning of the mountains to the north and to the south,” a reference to the 500 ft Azachorok Mountain that the village sits at the base of. This mountain, though nowhere near as massive as anything in the Alaska Range, was the first mountain encountered by those traveling up the lower Yukon River. Here you find adventure. As Helen Keller puts so very well. “Life is either a daring adventure or nothing.” That’s life in and around Mountain Village.

 

So when do we set our GPS for a pleasant visit to Mountain Village. The climate is primarily continental with temperatures that range from -44 to 80 °F and an annual precipitation of about 16 inches, with snowfall of 44 inches. The village is accessible by riverboat or barge from mid-June to October, and has summer road access to Pitka’s Point, Andreafsky and St. Mary’s. Might was to check the weather before you arrive and perhaps take along some warm garments.

 

After the village was established in 1908, residents of Liberty Landing and Johnny’s Place immigrated to the area and a Covenant Church missionary school was built. In 1923, a post office was built, and since it was a fishing village, a salmon saltery was opened in 1956 and a cannery in 1964. Today the village is home to the Stivers, who are part of the Lower Yukon School District. Scenic beauty abounds in all directions.  It is known as well as a highly diversified city.

 

I feel that it is always nice to get a second opinion of folks who have been to a site and Jana has that for us. She outlines her journey as a new teacher to a Yu’pik Eskimo village on the Yukon River near the Bering Sea with some neat photos. That’s one dedicated educator folks. Her blog archive is loaded with lots of personal experiences including a moose hunting adventure. It was a little scary when she elaborates on an experience that she labels “Frozen Eyeballs.” That’s what can happen on a snowmobile and one does not wear good googles and the precipitation is high.  Enough of that stuff.

 

Topix notes that modern conveniences like cellphones and the Internet increasingly make living in rural Alaska less rural and decidedly more intriguing. With small villages scattered across the largest state connected by frozen roads and air travel, Alaskans are innovative in many ways. You will have a fine collection of photos of the town and area all around Mountain View upon your return back home. You will feel welcomed in Mountain View, Alaska I discovered that you can take a Party Bus in Mountain Village that you wish to check out. Sounds like a real blast to me.

 

So visit with your travel agent and make plans for an adventure in Alaska, one must keep it straight as their are cities with the same name in Arkansas and Colorado as well.  Yes, you can fly into Mountain Village and here are several hotels. The airport [PAMO], is 2 miles NE of the town. Expedia can help you with a car rental. If you are “up for a travel bucket adventure,” Mountain Village awaits your arrival.  Enjoy your trip. -jeb

Leave a reply


Find Your Destination

Travel DestinationsTypes of Vacation/Travel
  • Polls

    Where would you most like to travel in 2013?

    View Results

    Loading ... Loading ...