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SENIORS VISIT VIRGINIA



Seniors Discover a Best Small Town

800px-Abingdon_VA_Welcome_Sign-e1447412408880I asked Google for the names of the best small towns in Virginia and up pops Abingdon, with a population of just over 8,000. Seniors, let’s check Abingdon out and see what makes it so special. It is said that there is “Always Something To Do In Abingdon”.

Abingdon, the seat of Washington County, is 133 miles southwest of Roanoke and is a designated Virginia Historic Landmark. The town encompasses several historically significant sites and features a fine arts and crafts scene centered on the galleries and museums along Main Street. Barter Theatre, designated as the “State Theatre of Virginia” in 1946, is one of the longest-running professional regional theaters in the nation.

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The settlement was originally known as Black’s Fort. In 1778, Black’s Fort was incorporated as the town of Abingdon, said to be named for the ancestral home of Martha Washington in Oxfordshire, England.

Could be, but other possible namesakes for the town include Daniel Boone’s home in Abington, Pennsylvania, or Lord Abingdon, friend of settler William Campbell. Me, I liked that one.

Seniors Enjoy Virginia Historic Landmark

It’s scenic in all directions. When you look at the mountains surrounding the town, you think of Daniel Boone walking through the woods or early American pioneers traveling the Great Road across the Blue Ridge Mountains to settle the new frontier.

Main Street in Abingdon, VA

When you stroll down Main Street, it will make you think about the Civil War soldiers involved in nearby battles who were treated by nurses on the grounds of what is now the elegant Martha Washington Hotel. Senior visitors, stroll the charming brick sidewalks of downtown Abingdon, named a Virginia Historic Landmark.

Pick up a brochure at the Visitor’s Center and take a self-guided walking tour.

Seniors Hike The Virginia Creeper Trail

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TripAdvisor invites seniors to check out the two dozen major attractions not to be missed in Abingdon. After taking in a presentation at the Barter Theater, bring along some good hiking shoes and take the World Class Virginia Creeper Trail, a 34.3-mile rail-to-recreation trail starting in Abingdon.

Being an amateur oenophile, this senior would want to visit the Abingdon Vineyard and Winery, a Virginia Farm Winery nestled along the South Holston River. They feature fine wines and scenic views in a quiet Virginia surrounding.

The area is known for boating, hiking, camping, biking, horseback riding and skiing, as well as Blue Grass music, storytelling and mountain crafts. Sounds like fun.

The Arts Depot would be another worthwhile stop as would be White’s Mill, where you can watch corn being ground and tour this historic structure.

So plan on dropping by Abingdon, VA, it will be a memorable visit. -jeb

SENIORS ENJOY FLORIDA



Seniors Visit the Butterfly Capital of the World

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Yes, it is in Florida and the city is called Coconut Creek. This senior has visited some fine butterfly houses like the one in Vienna, Austria, (The Vienna Schmetterlinghaus) the Botanical Garden in Phoenix and a couple of others, but the one in Coconut Creek matches any and all in the world.

It is nicknamed Butterfly Capital of the World, because it is home to the world’s largest butterfly aviary, with over 80 species and 5,000 individual butterflies. It all began when Ronald Boender started raising butterflies and their food plants in their Florida home and it went sky high from there.

The city took its name from the many coconut trees that were planted in the area by early developers. Robert E. Bateman, one of the developers, named Coconut Creek after combining the names of Miami-Dade County’s village of Indian Creek and the Miami neighborhood of Coconut Grove.

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Today the city has a population of around 56,000 and is part of the Miami–Fort Lauderdale–Pompano Beach Metropolitan Statistical Area, which is home to over five and a half million inhabitants.

Seniors Find Another Best City In America

Hi-lighted as one of the “Best Cities to Live in America” by Money Magazine, and a Top Ten Place to Live in Florida by Movoto and NerdWallet, annually Coconut Creek draws a host of folks of all ages to Broward County.

Senior visitors eventually head off to The Promenade at Coconut Creek, an outdoor lifestyle shopping destination with a wide array of upscale stores. Seminole Casino also is another major draw of visitors with over 2,400 Vegas-style and bingo-style machines.

1024px-Morpho_peleides_at_Butterfly_WorldTripAdvisor has sixteen attractions that you will not want to miss on your visit to Coconut Creek. Broward County notes that Coconut Creek is widely recognized as a well-planned community with a unique environmental consciousness. The city touts an abundance of trees, waterways, attractive landscaped roads, beautiful parks, and butterfly gardens throughout the neighborhoods.

Seniors Also Find A Community Wildlife Habitat

Coconut Creek is the first in the State of Florida and eleventh in the country to be certified as a Community Wildlife Habitat. Anyway you view Coconut Creek, it is the plethora of colorful butterflies in Butterfly World that would bring these seniors, me and my wife, to the city. In one word…they are awesome!

Toss your clubs in your vehicle and play a round or two at either the Adios or Wynmoor Golf Courses. Senior golfers will find several more courses in nearby Pompano Beach. So plan to visit Coconut Creek and discover the many amenities available and why the locals enjoy living in this community. -jeb

SENIORS LIKE TRAVELING IN CALIFORNIA



Seniors Enjoy Hopland

logoThis senior had not heard of Hopland until a relative brought a bottle of wine to celebrate Christmas with us. There it was on the bottle…Hopland, California. The population is small at only 756 residents.

The town gets its name from the fact that from the 1870s to the mid-1950s, much of the region’s economy was based on the growing and drying of bitter hops, a key flavoring and preservative in beer. Today, it is vineyards that play an important part of life in Hopland. Let’s go for a visit to the Campovida Winery… and note the beautiful setting.

Senior travelers will find Hopland at the start of the Redwoods of Northern California and is about two hours drive along U.S. Route 101 north of San Francisco, and a 30-minute drive along State Route 175 to California’s largest natural lake, Clear Lake. It is a rustic farming community situated amongst oak covered coastal foothills. It is said that the best time of the year for a visit is in late April, when the Solar Living Institute throws its Earth Day bash, complete with live music, garden demos, and organic food-wine pairings.

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 Lots Of Changes, Seniors Learn

The settlement that became Hopland was originally called Sanel. Over the years it was centered on either side of the Russian River. Sanel began on the west bank of the river in 1859. In 1874, the town moved to the east bank. The Sanel post office opened in 1860, closed for a time in 1869, moved and changed its name to Hopland in 1879, reverted to its original site and name in 1890, and changed its name finally to Hopland in 1891.

 And yes, TripAdvisor has a dozen attractions and things for senior visitors to enjoy on a stop in Hopland. Of course, visits to nearby wineries and distilleries rate high with visitors. The Hopland Sho-Ka-Wah Casino with Native American tribal decor offers table games, slots, a steakhouse and a casual bar. The McFadden Farm is a California producer of certified organic herbs and herb blends.

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Seniors Enjoy Beautiful Mendocino County

Appreciated as a place where deep knowledge of the land is expressed in artisanal wines, olive oils and honey, Hopland is the heart of the upper Russian River wine country and gateway to beautiful Mendocino County. HOPLAND PASSPORT wine weekend in October gives senior visitors the opportunity to visit 15 local wineries and sample their best wines, paired with incredible food at each stop.

Several cycling public routes from a 100-mile ride to a shorter 62-mile ride. Cycling and river kayaking are dominate sports in the Hopland area. Seasoned kayakers can enjoy paddling down the Russian River with put ins just south of Hopland. There are various segments between Hopland and Asti that offer class I to III rapids depending on the season. So bring along your bike or a kayak and give it a shot.

Locals offer farm, garden and wine tours and Hopland is home to one of the country’s most prestigious sustainable living training centers. In Hopland you will encounter real farmers, sophisticated artisans and everything in between.  -jeb

SUNDAY COFFEE WITH JEB



Seniors Take A Look At Huntington, NY

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The Town of Huntington, one of ten towns in Suffolk County, New York, is located on the north shore of Long Island in northwestern Suffolk County, with Long Island Sound to its north and Nassau County adjacent to the west. Senior travelers will find that Huntington, whose population is just over 203,000, is part of the New York metropolitan area. It is commonly referred to by residents as Huntington Village, though it is not incorporated and lacks a village government.

The birth of Huntington as a town began on April 2, (my birthday) 1653 when three men Robert Houldbrook, Robert Williams and Daniel Whitehead from Oyster Bay came along Oyster Bay Path, present day Route 25A/Main Street, to bargain with the Indians to purchase some land.

The History of Huntington is closely associated with the early development of the American colonies. The natural harbors offered ready access to the farmlands of the Long Island interior. The earliest residents of today’s Huntington were Matinecock Indians.

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Senior Visitors Find Harbors, Coves, Bays and Beaches

TripAdvisor invites senior visitors to take in Caumsett State Park and the Cold Spring Harbor Fish Hatchery and Aquarium. The  Township has  beautiful beaches and waterways, intimate villages and a thriving business community. With its vast array of shopping, restaurants, galleries, museums and entertainment, Huntington has it all together within 98 square miles.

So when you are in the “Big Apple,” Huntington is within easy commuting distance. The Long Island Rail Road, which has frequent schedules of trains, accommodates its commuters daily to New York City from the four local stations.

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And parks…here you will have access to a wide array with National Parks, State Parks, County Parks, Town Parks, and even Village Parks. Many parks offer a variety of activities, including swimming, boating, hiking, camping, playgrounds, biking, horseback riding, fishing, tennis courts, playing fields, golfing, and hunting. How’s that for variety? I’ll bet your picnic basket will be welcome there as well.

Seniors Like Good Restaurants

Huntington is neither incorporated nor an official government entity, but a restaurant-laden, shopper-happy 36-square-block cosmopolitan oasis, popular with senior tourists. My wife and I always enjoy seeing older homes. Senior visitors will find Shingled colonials, Victorians and Arts and Crafts-style cottages and a mosaic of homes on the wooded, hilly streets south of Route 25A near the village center.

We’d visit the Heckscher Museum of Art featuring a collection from the 15th to 20th century, European and American paintings, sculpture and works on paper.

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Huntington Village was the birthplace of singer Mariah Carey, actor Ralph Macchio, pioneering aeronautical engineer Leroy Grumman, and world renowned poet Walt Whitman. While you enjoy your coffee, you can read all about the history of Huntington. Enjoy -jeb

SENIORS TRAVEL THROUGH MONTANA



Seniors Enjoy Tiny Gardiner

welcome_to_gardiner_sign Senior travelers will find Gardiner in Park County, Montana with a population just under 1,000Gardiner was officially founded in 1880, but the area has served as a main entrance to Yellowstone National Park since its creation in 1872.

Parks’ Fly Shop, one of the oldest fly shops and guiding operations in the Yellowstone area, was started by Merton Parks in 1953.

Yellowstone National Park Heritage and Research Center, which opened May 18, 2005 is located in Gardiner and houses National Park Service archives, Yellowstone museum collections and reference libraries.

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The local Chamber of Commerce welcomes senior visitors from across the country to Gardiner.

They note that the entire area is home to the most diverse herds of large wildlife species in the lower 48 states including bison, bighorn sheep, elk, pronghorn, grizzly bears, black bears, wolves, and deer.

Seniors See The Roosevelt Arch

Wondering where the town’s name originated? I always do. The name Gardiner derives from Johnson Gardner, a fur trapper who operated in the area in 1830-31. He named the lush headwaters valley of today’s Gardner River Gardner’s Hole. Originally, named Gardner’s Fork, the river took on Gardner’s name although prospectors and explorers who visited the area later in the century were unaware of the trapper Johnson Gardner.

400px-YellowstonenorthIn 1870, when the Washburn-Langford-Doane Expedition passed through the area they began calling the river Gardiner. On February 9, 1880, a territorial post office was established just outside the park boundary and the beginning of Gardiner, Montana took place.

Today, the Roosevelt Arch is the most famous structure in Gardiner. This Yellowstone Entrance, Gateway or Arch was dedicated by President Theodore Roosevelt on April 24, 1903. The impressive arch can be visited just two miles north of Gardiner on Highway 89.

Senior Anglers Flock To Yellowstone’s Rivers

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The North Entrance Road Historic District comprises Yellowstone National Park’s North Entrance Road from Gardiner, Montana to the park headquarters at Mammoth Hot Springs, Wyoming, a distance of a little over five miles.

The North Entrance Road was the first major road in the park, necessary to join the U.S. Army station at Fort Yellowstone to the Northern Pacific Railroad at Gardiner.

Bring along your best fishing rod as angling in Yellowstone National Park is a major reason many senior visitors come to the park. In 2006, over 50,000 park fishing permits were issued to visitors. How about that?

The park contains hundreds of miles of accessible, high-quality trout rivers containing wild trout populations—over 200 creeks, streams and rivers are fishable.

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Get brave and take on a rafting expedition. Lots of fun and you are guaranteed to get wet.

Take in a quick view of the village and note the beautiful mountains in the background. Seniors, set your GPS for Gardiner and enjoy great clean mountain air and blue Montana skies. -jeb



Seniors seek adventure in Mountain Village, Alaska

 

Mountain Village, elevation 16 feet, is the 4th largest city in Wade Hampton Census Area, Alaska, located on the mighty Yukon River near the Yukon-Kuskokwim Delta with a population of 813 hearty residents in 211 housing units. Mountain Village is 20 miles west of St. Mary’s, a small Eskimo-Yup’ik village of approximately 700 inhabitants that manages to keep a relatively low profile and seldom does it make the urban newspapers. Cities near Mountain Village include Pitkas Point, St. Marys and Wade Hampton. The seasonal economy is based on fishing and subsistence. There are few full-time jobs, with the majority of employers being the City, school district, government, and native corporation. The Zip Code is 99632.

 

The history books tell us that Mountain Village was first established with the opening of a general store way back in 1908. Prior to that it had only been a summer fishing camp. Local lore attributes the founding of Mountain Village to a Yup’ik man by the name of Chekohak. The original name of the village was Asa’carsarmiut, which means “beginning of the mountains to the north and to the south,” a reference to the 500 ft Azachorok Mountain that the village sits at the base of. This mountain, though nowhere near as massive as anything in the Alaska Range, was the first mountain encountered by those traveling up the lower Yukon River. Here you find adventure. As Helen Keller puts so very well. “Life is either a daring adventure or nothing.” That’s life in and around Mountain Village.

 

So when do we set our GPS for a pleasant visit to Mountain Village. The climate is primarily continental with temperatures that range from -44 to 80 °F and an annual precipitation of about 16 inches, with snowfall of 44 inches. The village is accessible by riverboat or barge from mid-June to October, and has summer road access to Pitka’s Point, Andreafsky and St. Mary’s. Might was to check the weather before you arrive and perhaps take along some warm garments.

 

After the village was established in 1908, residents of Liberty Landing and Johnny’s Place immigrated to the area and a Covenant Church missionary school was built. In 1923, a post office was built, and since it was a fishing village, a salmon saltery was opened in 1956 and a cannery in 1964. Today the village is home to the Stivers, who are part of the Lower Yukon School District. Scenic beauty abounds in all directions.  It is known as well as a highly diversified city.

 

I feel that it is always nice to get a second opinion of folks who have been to a site and Jana has that for us. She outlines her journey as a new teacher to a Yu’pik Eskimo village on the Yukon River near the Bering Sea with some neat photos. That’s one dedicated educator folks. Her blog archive is loaded with lots of personal experiences including a moose hunting adventure. It was a little scary when she elaborates on an experience that she labels “Frozen Eyeballs.” That’s what can happen on a snowmobile and one does not wear good googles and the precipitation is high.  Enough of that stuff.

 

Topix notes that modern conveniences like cellphones and the Internet increasingly make living in rural Alaska less rural and decidedly more intriguing. With small villages scattered across the largest state connected by frozen roads and air travel, Alaskans are innovative in many ways. You will have a fine collection of photos of the town and area all around Mountain View upon your return back home. You will feel welcomed in Mountain View, Alaska I discovered that you can take a Party Bus in Mountain Village that you wish to check out. Sounds like a real blast to me.

 

So visit with your travel agent and make plans for an adventure in Alaska, one must keep it straight as their are cities with the same name in Arkansas and Colorado as well.  Yes, you can fly into Mountain Village and here are several hotels. The airport [PAMO], is 2 miles NE of the town. Expedia can help you with a car rental. If you are “up for a travel bucket adventure,” Mountain Village awaits your arrival.  Enjoy your trip. -jeb

Seniors seek adventure in Mountain Village, Alaska

 

Mountain Village, elevation 16 feet, is the 4th largest city in Wade Hampton Census Area, Alaska, located on the mighty Yukon River near the Yukon-Kuskokwim Delta with a population of 813 hearty residents in 211 housing units. Mountain Village is 20 miles west of St. Mary’s, a small Eskimo-Yup’ik village of approximately 700 inhabitants that manages to keep a relatively low profile and seldom does it make the urban newspapers. Cities near Mountain Village include Pitkas Point, St. Marys and Wade Hampton. The seasonal economy is based on fishing and subsistence. There are few full-time jobs, with the majority of employers being the City, school district, government, and native corporation. The Zip Code is 99632.

 

The history books tell us that Mountain Village was first established with the opening of a general store way back in 1908. Prior to that it had only been a summer fishing camp. Local lore attributes the founding of Mountain Village to a Yup’ik man by the name of Chekohak. The original name of the village was Asa’carsarmiut, which means “beginning of the mountains to the north and to the south,” a reference to the 500 ft Azachorok Mountain that the village sits at the base of. This mountain, though nowhere near as massive as anything in the Alaska Range, was the first mountain encountered by those traveling up the lower Yukon River. Here you find adventure. As Helen Keller puts so very well. “Life is either a daring adventure or nothing.” That’s life in and around Mountain Village.

 

So when do we set our GPS for a pleasant visit to Mountain Village. The climate is primarily continental with temperatures that range from -44 to 80 °F and an annual precipitation of about 16 inches, with snowfall of 44 inches. The village is accessible by riverboat or barge from mid-June to October, and has summer road access to Pitka’s Point, Andreafsky and St. Mary’s. Might was to check the weather before you arrive and perhaps take along some warm garments.

 

After the village was established in 1908, residents of Liberty Landing and Johnny’s Place immigrated to the area and a Covenant Church missionary school was built. In 1923, a post office was built, and since it was a fishing village, a salmon saltery was opened in 1956 and a cannery in 1964. Today the village is home to the Stivers, who are part of the Lower Yukon School District. Scenic beauty abounds in all directions.  It is known as well as a highly diversified city.

 

I feel that it is always nice to get a second opinion of folks who have been to a site and Jana has that for us. She outlines her journey as a new teacher to a Yu’pik Eskimo village on the Yukon River near the Bering Sea with some neat photos. That’s one dedicated educator folks. Her blog archive is loaded with lots of personal experiences including a moose hunting adventure. It was a little scary when she elaborates on an experience that she labels “Frozen Eyeballs.” That’s what can happen on a snowmobile and one does not wear good googles and the precipitation is high.  Enough of that stuff.

 

Topix notes that modern conveniences like cellphones and the Internet increasingly make living in rural Alaska less rural and decidedly more intriguing. With small villages scattered across the largest state connected by frozen roads and air travel, Alaskans are innovative in many ways. You will have a fine collection of photos of the town and area all around Mountain View upon your return back home. You will feel welcomed in Mountain View, Alaska I discovered that you can take a Party Bus in Mountain Village that you wish to check out. Sounds like a real blast to me.

 

So visit with your travel agent and make plans for an adventure in Alaska, one must keep it straight as their are cities with the same name in Arkansas and Colorado as well.  Yes, you can fly into Mountain Village and here are several hotels. The airport [PAMO], is 2 miles NE of the town. Expedia can help you with a car rental. If you are “up for a travel bucket adventure,” Mountain Village awaits your arrival.  Enjoy your trip. -jeb

Filed under : Editors Choice

SENIORS TRAVEL TO BELGIUM



Seniors Take In a Gem Called Antwerp

Unknown-1Seniors, have you been to Belgium? Antwerp is one of those cities that attracts thousands of visitors of all ages from around the world.  Antwerp is the capital of the Antwerp province of Belgium located on the right bank of the Scheldt River.

With a population of 510,000, it is the second most populous city in Belgium, after the capital Brussels. The name “Antwerp”, in case you are wondering, is most likely derived from “aan de werpe“, which is Dutch for “at the throw”, referring to a place where the bending river throws its sand.

 Seniors Enjoy World’s Leading Diamond City

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Renowned for being the “world’s leading diamond city“, more than 70% of all diamonds are traded in Antwerp. The Diamond Market is the hub of the economic section in Belgium. More than 50% of cut diamonds and 40% of industrial diamonds are traded in the city.

Even back in the 16th century, Antwerp was one of the most important financial centers of the world, where traders from all over Europe and Asia sold and bought their goods. Eupedia (new to me) has a helpful overview for senior tourists that includes major highlights you will not want to miss.

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‘Antwerp (Antwerpen/Anvers in Dutch/French) is the country’s capital of cool, a powerful magnet for mode moguls, club queens, art lovers and diamond dealers.’

In the mid-16th century it had been one of Europe’s most important cities and home to artist Pieter Paul Rubens, as you’ll be so constantly reminded.

‘Despite many historical disasters and severe WWII bombings, the city retains an intriguing medieval heart with café-filled cobbled lanes, a riverside fortress and an impressive cathedral.’ Today, Antwerp is known for its fashion, entertainment scene and architectural and cultural heritage.

Fashion, Design, Music…

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The NY Times gives senior visitors 36 hours to explore this magnificent city. TripAdvisor calls the city a “hidden gem”. It is loaded with museums, churches and historic streets. One thing for sure is that you will not be able to miss the huge port that dominates much of the city.

Diamonds, sure, and Belgian chocolate, yes, and the big cathedral, most assuredly.  Antwerp today however is more about fashion, design, music jams, cocktails, record labels, and spending your money on a sunny terrace.

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Antwerp has one of the highest density of cultural venues per capita in Europe. You will undoubtedly start off in Antwerp’s Grote Markt (town square), a jewel of 16th century architecture and the houses of the Guilds, the Stadhuis (Town Hall) and the 1887 statue of Brabo, the legendary slayer of the giant.

‘Hofstraat’, a street situated near the Town Square, is the place where the ‘Old Stock Exchange’ stood until 1533. Seniors, include Antwerp in your next European trip. – jeb

SUNDAY COFFEE WITH JEB



Seniors Dine Well in Waxhaw, NC

benchSlow Food USA recently designated Waxhaw as a place senior gourmands might enjoy  some great food…from New Town Farms. Waxhaw (originally called the Wysacky), is a town located in Union County, North Carolina with a population right at 10,000.

Slow Food is a group of dedicated to sustainable local agriculture and Matt Jones shared this great new find with USA Today (Oct. 19). Farm-to-table restaurants are booming all over the country, he writes, and farms are getting into the act. They offer super-fresh cuisine that is often raised on site.

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New Town Farms is that small family farm, established in 1990 by Sammy and Melinda Koenigsberg.

New Town Farms focuses on the art and craft of growing vegetables on a five acre garden, and has diversified to include what they call “pastured poultry”, “pastured laying hens”, and “Heritage breed, free range hogs.”

Sound good to you? New Town Farms is able put together a full meal from the farm.

 Seniors Surprised By Serene, Park-like Farm

Arriving at the farm, senior visitors would not expect a meandering gravel drive with well-established trees ringing a beautiful lake.  New Town Farms is so serene, it feels more park-like with trees and shade, open pasture for chickens, wooded areas for the Ossabaw hogs and a tilled garden.

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There is a beautiful house on the property that the Koenigsbergs hope one day to turn into a related enterprise – an Inn that would serve guests food from the farm.  It’s a fitting vision for a family that is so incredibly hospitable.

Sammy Koenigsberg, a former architect, who operates the farm with his family, says “Healthy Soil.  Healthy Plants.  Healthy Us.”

Sammy writes…”We are a small diversified family farm with a focus on certified organic vegetables. We also raise pastured poultry, Heritage breed pastured pork, and free range eggs. We market our food through Community Supported Agriculture, The Matthews Community Farmers market, and to local restaurants.

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Our season begins early spring and goes throughout the summer, usually ending in September. We harvest every Tuesday and members of the Community Supported Agriculture Program pick up on the farm or have a choice of two other pick up points in Charlotte.

We plan and plant for the largest variety of vegetables possible including a lot of specialty items The vegetables are always harvested and delivered on the same day”

Seniors Learn A New Kind Of Farming

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Sammy built a poultry processing facility. Seniors can learn about his love for Red Bro chickens, how financially beneficial the facility has been, what it takes to build a poultry processing facility, and the importance of learning about where our food comes from.

Seniors, here is a site that will fill you in on products and crops from the organic gardens at New Town Farms.

Plan on viewing the farm and spending an evening dining with the Koenisbergs and enjoying their special cuisine. It will be memorable. jeb

HAPPY NEW YEAR SENIOR TRAVELERS



We wish our senior friends happy traveling this year.  Stay safe.  Enjoy.  Be blessed.

from Jim and Jeannine

 

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Filed under : Editors Choice

CHRISTMAS GREETINGS FROM THE BECKERS



To our faithful readers and fellow travelers,

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from the Beckers

Filed under : Editors Choice

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