SENIORS JOURNEY THROUGH WASHINGTON



Seniors Pay A Visit To Lynnwood

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Lynnwood, Washington with a population that runs right at 36,000, is called a “bedroom to Seattle” its next-door neighbor and is a “hub city” due to its retail shopping.  Seniors ask, “why the name Lynnwood”?

A developer from Seattle planned to build something at Hwy. 99 and Alderwood Road, (now 196th St SW). He named the building “Lynn” for his wife and “wood” for Alderwood. Many other stores around took the name Lynnwood and became known as the Lynnwood Business District.

Whether indoors or outdoors, Alderwood Mall is Puget’s Sound’s favorite destination for shopping, popular dining and a host of entertainment venues. Me, I’d like to take in the AMC Cinema, a 16 screen movie-plex featuring IMAX movies that I always enjoy wherever I travel.

Seniors Find Gateway To North Puget Sound

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Senior visitors will find Central Washington University, Edmonds Community College and some fine secondary and elementary schools in town. Located just 16 miles north of Seattle and minutes from ferries, mountains, wineries and casinos, Lynnwood is the ideal gateway to everything the North Puget Sound has to offer.

Seniors can float a river, hike a mountain trail or shop till you drop. Lynnwood offers senior visitors beautiful city parks, extensive public art, historic Heritage Park, hiking trails, an aquatic center, a municipal golf course and a myriad of diverse dining options.

Outdoor music and performances during the long warm summer evenings are offered by Lynnwood and surrounding communities. Ethnic Fairs, Parades and Festivals plus a host of other celebrations that include dance, crafts and food are popular all year long.

Seniors Also Find Great Wineries And Breweries

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Washington State is known for great wine and the wineries and wine tasting rooms in Snohomish County are diverse, innovative and tasty.  Were you aware that Washington State ranks second, only to California, in the production of grapes used to create premium table wines in the United States? And if you can’t make Munich for Oktoberfest this fall, there are over 75 micro-breweries and 350 different types of beers being produced in the state.

Take in a Seattle Mariner baseball game at Safeco Field in Seattle, only a 30 minute drive away. And if you enjoy the WNBA, the Seattle Storm plays their games in Key Arena in Seattle and the Seahawk and Washington Huskies football teams pack the house as well.

And just imagine a city with 17 public parks sprinkled throughout the area. Bring your bike or a pair of good hiking shoes and trek the Interurban Trail. Hop in and take a drive through Downtown Lynnwood and all its green scenic beauty.   -jeb

SENIORS JOURNEY THROUGH SOUTH DAKOTA



Seniors Enjoy Small Town Sisseton

imagesSenior travelers will find Sisseton on the Lake Traverse Indian Reservation in South Dakota with a population of 2,500. This county seat of Roberts County is just off of I-29 between Sioux Falls and Fargo, North Dakota. On a state map Sisseton is way up in the northeast corner of the state.  Sisseton gets it name from a division of Native American Sioux living in the area.

 A major attraction for senior visitors is the 75-foot Nicollet Tower and Interpretive Center. The Tower honors Joseph N. Nicollet, the French mapmaker who explored the Côteau des Prairies in the 1830′s.

The Nicollet Interpretive Center features Nicollet’s great map, a documentary film and John S. Wilson’s artwork. Many folks enjoy a climb to the top of the Nicollet tower for a stunning panoramic view of the entire area. While in town, take a tour the Sisseton Wahpeton College that was established in 1979 as an entity of the Sisseton Wahpeton Oyate. Today the College serves the Dakota people.

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Senior Travelers Enjoy The Beauty and Friendly Folk.

The town homepage notes that Sisseton is wrapped in Native American and immigrant history as rich as any in the American West. and the town celebrates a place of singular beauty and friendly folk. Established on the northern fringe of the vast Côteau des Prairies (Hills of the Prairie – 200 miles long and 100 miles wide), this active community commands an idyllic position in South Dakota.

Senior travelers can enjoy  six nearby state parks and recreation areas, clear lakes and rolling grasslands, as well as exceptional camping, hunting, fishing, golfing, biking and hiking opportunities.

For a small town, Sisseton is loaded with things to see and do. Sisseton is blessed with water, lots of it. Along the rolling hills of the Côteau des Prairies more than 30 glacial lakes punctuate the landscape, within a short drive of Sisseton.

Senior Pheasant Hunters, Take Note…

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A local appliance store is called Pheasant Haven and for good reason. South Dakota is known for the wide spanses of great pheasant hunting. I’ve known hunters to drive across a couple of states just to take part in the hunting season.

The land is one of the most unique physiographic regions in eastern South Dakota. Over 20,000 years ago during the last Ice Age, a glacier hundreds of feet thick pushed up a moraine of glacial deposits almost 900 feet high forming a flatiron-shaped plateau.

The Stavig House Museum is a spacious and elegant three story Victorian home built by Norwegian immigrant Andrew Stavig in 1916. It is listed on the National Historic Register. Guided tours focus on the architecture of the house and the story of an immigrant family. I know that my wife would want us to tour that house.

Seniors, set your GPS to this neat small town in South Dakota and enjoy all that it has to offer. -jeb

SENIORS LIKE WASHINGTON



Seniors Take In Sammamish

images-1I recently saw the name Sammamish, had never heard that name before and so I figured it was time to check out the town and to see why we senior travelers might enjoy a visit.

Sammamish, with a population of 46,000+, is an Eastside suburb of Seattle in King County, the largest county in the state by population.

The county is home to roughly 30% of the state’s residents and stretches from Puget Sound to the Cascade Range, encompassing the major cities of Seattle and Bellevue and their sprawling suburbs and it’s full of beautiful scenery.

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Sammamish is a very friendly place to visit and to live. The city ranked 15th in CNN Money magazine’s 2011 review of the best places to live in the United States. Forbes ranked Sammamish #1 in its 2012 list of the Friendliest Towns in the United States.

It is bordered by beautiful Lake Sammamish to the west, Redmond to the north, Issaquah to the south, and the Snoqualmie Valley to the east. There are two lakes on the plateau, Pine Lake and Beaver Lake, each surrounded with history.

 Seniors Enjoy A City of Scenic Woods and Trails

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There are plenty of opportunities for water recreation at Lake Sammamish and Lake Sammamish State Park. The city is loaded with scenic woods and hiking trails.

Senior golf enthusiasts find world class facilities offered at Sahalee Country Club and Plateau Club. Take in the Sammamish Symphony Orchestra that features local artists performing five concerts per year.

Sammamish has an obscure history, beginning as a subdivision of the Inglewood community. The main industry was the shingle mill business, whose growth caused the community to develop. Once the timber diminished in the 20′s, the town had its difficulties.

It wasn’t until the boom that brought businesses to Redmond and Bellevue that Sammamish once again became an attractive place to in which to live. Today Bellevue Community College, City University, Renton Technical College, and Seattle University provide higher education opportunities for many of the locals. I counted 16 different schools including the 3 high schools in Sammamish.

 Seniors Find Great Shopping and Dining in Sammamish

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The heart of Sammamish lies along 228th Ave where senior visitors will find great shopping. The Saffron Center is a newly constructed complex with a wide variety of shops and dining establishments.

Sammamish has two wonderful parks to visit. Lake Sammamish State Park is a 512-acre park with 6,858-feet of waterfront on Lake Sammamish. The area around the lake was an important culture zone for local Native American tribes for centuries.

The park provides deciduous forest and wetland vegetation. A salmon-bearing creek and a great-blue-heron rookery provide wildlife viewing opportunities. Beaver Lake Park offers opportunities for recreation, hiking, and exploring its 54 forested acres. In addition, Beaver Lake is a popular fishing spot.

Seniors, when you are in the great northwest, stop in Sammamish and see for yourself why Forbes ranked the city #1. Enjoy Sammamish. - jeb

SENIORS JOURNEY THROUGH NEBRASKA



Seniors Spend time In Wayne, Nebraska

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Wayne, a city in Wayne County, Nebraska with a population of around 6,000, is the county seat and the home of Wayne State College. So why the name Wayne, senior visitors ask? Railroad officials originally named Wayne Brookdale, but the settlers prevailed upon the company to name the community the same as the county, in memory of General “Mad” Anthony Wayne of Revolutionary War fame.

Today, Wayne is a community blessed with a unique blend of industry, agriculture and higher education. Mayor Ken Chamberlain wishes to welcome you to his city. Wayne, the mayor notes… “is rich in history, and actively steps into the future with vigorous development and an innovative attitude. Our friendly people, sound economy and comfortable lifestyle make Wayne a great place to live and work.”

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Seniors Visit the Ashfall Fossil Beds Historical Park

Senior visitors discover the Bike and Hike Trail and the Ashfall Fossil Beds State Historical Park. The Park includes a visitor center with interpretive displays, a working fossil laboratory, and a building over an ongoing excavation site that features native American rhinos and ancestral horses.

Smithsonian Magazine writes… “Prehistoric rhinoceroses and horses died of volcanic ash inhalation 12 million years ago – their fossils are studied now as a perfect example of natural selection.”

Chicken Show

The Wayne Chicken Show is a fun event that provides a relaxed atmosphere and friendly environment for the whole family. It is held annually on the second Saturday in July.

Senior visitors can take in an “egg”-normous parade, hilarious chicken-related contests, games, dancing, and entertainment.

Seniors Tour Wayne State Campus

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I think that my wife and I would enjoy  the Wayne County museum, housed in the Rollie Ley mansion, built in the 1890s. The home reflects a Victorian Colonial style and features original woodwork, carvings and turn-of-the-century items of historical interest.

TripAdvisor suggests that you not skip Riley’s Bar, a popular place in town. Check out Wayne State Campus,  The Fred G. Dale Planetarium located on campus in the Carhart Science Building and a series of programs held during the year on Sunday afternoons, beginning in November.

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Being a Master Gardener, I’d have to take my wife to Garden Perennials where we could walk among three acres of flowers. We would enjoy the display gardens at a picturesque location in the country. The garden features flowering perennials, Asiatic lilies and various wildflowers.

I’ll top off Wayne with a video called Wayne Works that highlights the friendly community and its families. Senior travelers, enjoy this college town. -jeb

SENIORS JOURNEY THROUGH KENTUCKY



Seniors Discover Historic Bardstown

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USA Today selected Bardstown, Kentucky (Bourbon Capital of the World) as one of the ten best southern towns in the nation. When I read that in the paper, this senior wanted to travel to travel to  Bardstown to see what’s there. So that’s where we’re headed today.

In addition, after a 5-month long nationwide competition, Bardstown, Kentucky was named the ‘Most Beautiful Small Town in America” in the Best of the Road Competition sponsored by Rand McNally and USA Today.

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At any given time, Kentucky has more barrels of bourbon aging than people – some 5 million to its 4.2 million population. If you are interested in knowing how bourbon is made, plan a visit to the Barton 1792 Distillery & Visitor Center.  Tours and tastings are always complimentary.

Seniors Catch A Festival

After that visit, take a carriage ride that provides senior visitors with a slow-paced means to see the sites of historic Bardstown up close. Downtown Bardstown offers something for everyone including browsing eclectic shops, dining in fine restaurants, and visiting a variety of historic attractions.  30 festivals are celebrated each year, so its highly likely you just might see one when you travel through Bardstown.

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Bardstown is the county seat of Nelson County with a population of around 12,000. It got its name from the pioneering Bard brothers. David Bard attained 1,000 acres in land grant in 1785. This second oldest city in Kentucky was first settled in 1780, so history is an important part of the city.

As settlers migrated west following the Revolutionary War, Bardstown became the first center of Catholicism west of the Appalachian Mountains.

The Gethsemani Abbey, founded in 1848 by the Order of Trappist Cistercians, is home today to Trappist monks who open doors to spiritual seekers from all over the world.

 Seniors Enjoy A Dinner Train

Kentucky_Bourbon_FestivalI know that my brother-in-law, with a model train track in his backyard in Iowa, would head off to the Kentucky Railway Museum that holds more than 70 pieces of rail equipment, a dining car exhibit, a ticket office and a display of steam locomotive whistles.

My Old Kentucky Dinner Train serves senior visitors four-course dinners in restored vintage dining cars while rolling through Kentucky Bourbon Country in the scenic Rolling Fork River Valley

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Nelson County has more than 300 buildings on the National Register of Historic Places; nearly 200 of them are in the historic downtown district of Bardstown.

Remember Stephen Foster? He wrote the state song “My Old Kentucky Home.” Federal Hill in Old Kentucky State Park was the inspiration for that song and the old mansion built in 1812 can be visited.

The Chuckleberry Farm and Winery on the outskirts of Bardstown is where the action is and where senior visitors can enjoy blackberry cobbler and fresh fruit, in season. It’s in Bardstown where you can experience a true southern city, abounding with hospitality and history. -jeb

SENIORS DRIVE THROUGH CALIFORNIA



Seniors Settle Into Walnut Creek

Unknown This senior can’t travel to every town, city, country, borough, or county with an interesting name or where something catches my eye, so I write blogs on them. Right now I’m trying to remember how Walnut Creek caught my attention.

Aha, I just discovered that Walnut Creek was Voted in 1989 by the National Conference of Mayors as “The most livable small city in the nation.” That was it! Recent downtown renovation has made Walnut Creek even nicer.

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Walnut Creek was first known as “The Corners” — where the two roads leading from Pacheco and Lafayette converged. Today those “corners” are at the intersection of Mt. Diablo Boulevard and North Main Street. The oldest commercial structure still standing in Walnut Creek is the Albert Sherburne store, built around 1863.

Seniors Find Interesting History in Walnut Creek

Walnut Creek, pop. 65,000+,  is located 16 miles east of the city of Oakland and 23 miles east of San Francisco on I-680. The first known inhabitants of the Walnut Creek area were the Bolbones Indians.

In March 1772, the first Spanish explorers arrived. California became a possession of Mexico following the Mexican Revolution in 1821. To encourage settlement in its newly-acquired territory, Mexico made large land grants, four of which were in the Walnut Creek area.

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The Walnut Creek Homepage is simply loaded with lots and lots of information on the city. Spend some time here and you will learn lots about this “most livable city.” If you enjoy shopping, Walnut Creek is for you. The Broadway Plaza shopping center has several major anchor tenants, and is part of the downtown retail and restaurant district.

Roads are bicycle and pedestrian friendly. The pedestrian walkways are lined with trees so senior visitors will enjoy just strolling. And Walnut Creek has cultural offerings: the Lindsay Wildlife Museum, closely followed by the Lesner Center for the Arts.

Seniors Enjoy the Art & Wine Festival

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Me I’d head for the Ruth Bancroft Garden housing more than 2,000 cacti and drought resistant plants and an ongoing plant sale. The Walnut Creek Chamber of Commerce annually celebrates the Walnut Creek Art & Wine Festival, a tradition that started in 1982 with two days of entertainment.

It’s a major event in town that brings in throngs of visitors from all over the state and nation. Hand-made crafts and works of art from more than 200 artisans, award-winning local and regional wines and microbrews and more packs the house, and its all free.

For seniors with a demanding palate, there are a host of quality restaurants in Walnut Creek. TripAdvisor highlights the Val de Vi Bistro and Wine Bar, the San Francisco Creamery Co. and Salvatore Ristorante Italian.

Walnut Creek Downtown has its own website with an invitation for a Walnut Creek Walk. Set your GPS for Walnut Creek and enjoy. -jeb

SUNDAY COFFEE WITH JEB



Seniors Enjoy Historic New Hyde Park, NY

aff61c8aeca871736f391f40badcb614 New Hyde Park, a village on Long Island, with 10,000 inhabitants, is primarily a commuter town with over 75% of the land used for single family residences. Seniors find this is one of the oldest and most historic settlements in the United States. The first settlers were Dutch and English.

The New Hyde Park Museum in Village Hall is packed with exhibits that exemplify the town’s past. Senior visitors will dine well in the many restaurants, enjoying a wide variety of ethnic dishes. Let TripAdvisor make some suggestions to those of you with a fine palate. Mama Theresa’s Pizzeria looks like a great place to start off with and Umberto’s is close behind.

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We can trace the history of New Hyde Park back to Thomas Dongan, the fourth royal governor of New York, who was granted an 800-acre parcel of land in 1683 that included New Hyde Park. It was known as “Dongan’s Farm.”

Dongan built a mansion on what is now Lakeville Road. In 1715, Dongan’s estate was sold to George Clarke, who was Secretary of the Provence of New York. He named it Hyde Park in honor of his wife, Ann Hyde. When a post office opened in 1871, the name was changed from Hyde Park to New Hyde Park to avoid confusion with another Hyde Park in upstate NY.

Senior Visitors Enjoy Memorial Park

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Memorial Park has just been reconstructed for the enjoyment of the locals as well as senior visitors.  Summer concerts held in the Park has many folks thumping their feet. The annual Village Community Clean Up Day draws many volunteers from clubs who donate their time and energy into this community effort.

Among notable people who called New Hyde Park home is Al Oerter. I remember him when I followed the Olympic Games, years ago. Oerter was a four-time gold medalist in the discus throw (1956, 1960, 1964, 1968).

Seniors, I hope you enjoyed your coffee in New Hyde Park, one of the oldest and most historic settlements in the whole country.  -jeb



Seniors seek adventure in Mountain Village, Alaska

 

Mountain Village, elevation 16 feet, is the 4th largest city in Wade Hampton Census Area, Alaska, located on the mighty Yukon River near the Yukon-Kuskokwim Delta with a population of 813 hearty residents in 211 housing units. Mountain Village is 20 miles west of St. Mary’s, a small Eskimo-Yup’ik village of approximately 700 inhabitants that manages to keep a relatively low profile and seldom does it make the urban newspapers. Cities near Mountain Village include Pitkas Point, St. Marys and Wade Hampton. The seasonal economy is based on fishing and subsistence. There are few full-time jobs, with the majority of employers being the City, school district, government, and native corporation. The Zip Code is 99632.

 

The history books tell us that Mountain Village was first established with the opening of a general store way back in 1908. Prior to that it had only been a summer fishing camp. Local lore attributes the founding of Mountain Village to a Yup’ik man by the name of Chekohak. The original name of the village was Asa’carsarmiut, which means “beginning of the mountains to the north and to the south,” a reference to the 500 ft Azachorok Mountain that the village sits at the base of. This mountain, though nowhere near as massive as anything in the Alaska Range, was the first mountain encountered by those traveling up the lower Yukon River. Here you find adventure. As Helen Keller puts so very well. “Life is either a daring adventure or nothing.” That’s life in and around Mountain Village.

 

So when do we set our GPS for a pleasant visit to Mountain Village. The climate is primarily continental with temperatures that range from -44 to 80 °F and an annual precipitation of about 16 inches, with snowfall of 44 inches. The village is accessible by riverboat or barge from mid-June to October, and has summer road access to Pitka’s Point, Andreafsky and St. Mary’s. Might was to check the weather before you arrive and perhaps take along some warm garments.

 

After the village was established in 1908, residents of Liberty Landing and Johnny’s Place immigrated to the area and a Covenant Church missionary school was built. In 1923, a post office was built, and since it was a fishing village, a salmon saltery was opened in 1956 and a cannery in 1964. Today the village is home to the Stivers, who are part of the Lower Yukon School District. Scenic beauty abounds in all directions.  It is known as well as a highly diversified city.

 

I feel that it is always nice to get a second opinion of folks who have been to a site and Jana has that for us. She outlines her journey as a new teacher to a Yu’pik Eskimo village on the Yukon River near the Bering Sea with some neat photos. That’s one dedicated educator folks. Her blog archive is loaded with lots of personal experiences including a moose hunting adventure. It was a little scary when she elaborates on an experience that she labels “Frozen Eyeballs.” That’s what can happen on a snowmobile and one does not wear good googles and the precipitation is high.  Enough of that stuff.

 

Topix notes that modern conveniences like cellphones and the Internet increasingly make living in rural Alaska less rural and decidedly more intriguing. With small villages scattered across the largest state connected by frozen roads and air travel, Alaskans are innovative in many ways. You will have a fine collection of photos of the town and area all around Mountain View upon your return back home. You will feel welcomed in Mountain View, Alaska I discovered that you can take a Party Bus in Mountain Village that you wish to check out. Sounds like a real blast to me.

 

So visit with your travel agent and make plans for an adventure in Alaska, one must keep it straight as their are cities with the same name in Arkansas and Colorado as well.  Yes, you can fly into Mountain Village and here are several hotels. The airport [PAMO], is 2 miles NE of the town. Expedia can help you with a car rental. If you are “up for a travel bucket adventure,” Mountain Village awaits your arrival.  Enjoy your trip. -jeb

Seniors seek adventure in Mountain Village, Alaska

 

Mountain Village, elevation 16 feet, is the 4th largest city in Wade Hampton Census Area, Alaska, located on the mighty Yukon River near the Yukon-Kuskokwim Delta with a population of 813 hearty residents in 211 housing units. Mountain Village is 20 miles west of St. Mary’s, a small Eskimo-Yup’ik village of approximately 700 inhabitants that manages to keep a relatively low profile and seldom does it make the urban newspapers. Cities near Mountain Village include Pitkas Point, St. Marys and Wade Hampton. The seasonal economy is based on fishing and subsistence. There are few full-time jobs, with the majority of employers being the City, school district, government, and native corporation. The Zip Code is 99632.

 

The history books tell us that Mountain Village was first established with the opening of a general store way back in 1908. Prior to that it had only been a summer fishing camp. Local lore attributes the founding of Mountain Village to a Yup’ik man by the name of Chekohak. The original name of the village was Asa’carsarmiut, which means “beginning of the mountains to the north and to the south,” a reference to the 500 ft Azachorok Mountain that the village sits at the base of. This mountain, though nowhere near as massive as anything in the Alaska Range, was the first mountain encountered by those traveling up the lower Yukon River. Here you find adventure. As Helen Keller puts so very well. “Life is either a daring adventure or nothing.” That’s life in and around Mountain Village.

 

So when do we set our GPS for a pleasant visit to Mountain Village. The climate is primarily continental with temperatures that range from -44 to 80 °F and an annual precipitation of about 16 inches, with snowfall of 44 inches. The village is accessible by riverboat or barge from mid-June to October, and has summer road access to Pitka’s Point, Andreafsky and St. Mary’s. Might was to check the weather before you arrive and perhaps take along some warm garments.

 

After the village was established in 1908, residents of Liberty Landing and Johnny’s Place immigrated to the area and a Covenant Church missionary school was built. In 1923, a post office was built, and since it was a fishing village, a salmon saltery was opened in 1956 and a cannery in 1964. Today the village is home to the Stivers, who are part of the Lower Yukon School District. Scenic beauty abounds in all directions.  It is known as well as a highly diversified city.

 

I feel that it is always nice to get a second opinion of folks who have been to a site and Jana has that for us. She outlines her journey as a new teacher to a Yu’pik Eskimo village on the Yukon River near the Bering Sea with some neat photos. That’s one dedicated educator folks. Her blog archive is loaded with lots of personal experiences including a moose hunting adventure. It was a little scary when she elaborates on an experience that she labels “Frozen Eyeballs.” That’s what can happen on a snowmobile and one does not wear good googles and the precipitation is high.  Enough of that stuff.

 

Topix notes that modern conveniences like cellphones and the Internet increasingly make living in rural Alaska less rural and decidedly more intriguing. With small villages scattered across the largest state connected by frozen roads and air travel, Alaskans are innovative in many ways. You will have a fine collection of photos of the town and area all around Mountain View upon your return back home. You will feel welcomed in Mountain View, Alaska I discovered that you can take a Party Bus in Mountain Village that you wish to check out. Sounds like a real blast to me.

 

So visit with your travel agent and make plans for an adventure in Alaska, one must keep it straight as their are cities with the same name in Arkansas and Colorado as well.  Yes, you can fly into Mountain Village and here are several hotels. The airport [PAMO], is 2 miles NE of the town. Expedia can help you with a car rental. If you are “up for a travel bucket adventure,” Mountain Village awaits your arrival.  Enjoy your trip. -jeb

Filed under : Editors Choice

SENIORS STOP IN NORTH CAROLINA



Seniors Cruise Into Morehead City

imagesIn one of my most recent travel magazines, this senior noted that a cruise line stopped in North Carolina.  The name of the town was Morehead City.  I had not heard of that town, thus this blog.

Morehead City  is a port town in Carteret County, North Carolina with a population of around 9,000, making it the largest city in the county. Morehead City celebrated the 150th anniversary of its founding on May 5, 2007. It forms part of what is called the Crystal Coast and is called “A Fishing Paradise.”

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Morehead City is one of North Carolina’s only two seaports, so marine industry  and cruises play an invaluable role in local industry and economy. Originally it was called Shepard’s Point, but was officially named Morehead City around 1857.

Nautical traffic along the Atlantic Ocean has been ongoing as far back as the American Civil War, when Fort Macon in Atlantic Beach served as an important base for both Confederate and Union armies.

Seniors Find Scenic Surroundings in Morehead City

Tourism is at the masthead of Morehead City’s industry and economy.  Every facet of local life is built around the scenic environment and a plethora of resources that includes boating, fishing, seafood, and coastal arts and crafts.  Senior visitors will discover that the streets in town are lined with marinas, restaurants, shops and art galleries… a shopping mecca for tourists.

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Mayor Jerry Jones notes that…It is a pleasure to extend an invitation… “to explore our various museums and historic sites, to shop and dine on the Morehead City Waterfront and to relax and enjoy our many public beach accesses, parks and recreation facilities. We are also home to the Morehead Marlins, a collegiate baseball team… and the largest free public fishing pier and boat launching facility in our area. All our citizens enjoy coastal living at its finest every day of the year…”

Lots For Senior Visitors To See and Do in Morehead City

My wife and I would enjoy an evening at The Morehead Center for Performing Arts & Events where they present a wide variety of comedy shows, live music, comedians and more. 

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The Carteret Community Theatre welcomes senior visitors to some of the most exciting live entertainment venues on the Crystal Coast. Plays, country, comedy, rock, Motown, magic, live theater and holiday delights are just a few of the many shows scheduled this year for your enjoyment.

Eco-Tours, Dive Tours, Boat Tours, Scuba and Snorkeling and a wide array of outdoor activities are all part of Morehead City. And for the ladies, there are several spas in town. Seniors, set your GPS for Morehead City  and plan to spend a couple of days enjoying the Atlantic Ocean air and the many amenities of the area. -jeb

SENIORS ENJOY WEST VIRGINIA



Seniors Drop In On Another “Burg”

800px-Parkersburg_West_Virginia_floodwallThis senior likes towns that end in “burg” because I just know that there was someone behind the official name of the town. Parkersburg, West Virginia (pop. 32,000) along the Ohio River is a good example.

When the city was settled in the late 18th century following the American Revolutionary War, it was named Newport. This was part of a westward migration of settlers from parts of Virginia to the east, closer to the Atlantic Ocean.

A town section was laid out on land granted to Alexander Parker for his Revolutionary War service. The title conflicts between Parker and the city planners of Newport were settled in 1809 in favor of his heirs. The town was renamed Parkersburg in 1810. The town motto is “Where West Virginia Began.”

Festivals And Historic District Welcomes Seniors

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The Annual Mid-Ohio Valley Multi-Cultural Festival, an international festival featuring traditional dance and music and an international marketplace is held in June.

The Parkersburg Homecoming Festival is held in August and features a parade, fireworks, half-marathon, competitions and entertainment.

Julia-Ann Square Historic District, where my wife and I would start our visit, was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1977. In Parkersburg senior visitors will experience the intriguing past of one of West Virginia’s most historic cities through colorful and fascinating museums and historic sites.

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Add The Castle (1209 Ann Street) to your list of classic and historic homes along with the Van Winkle-Wix House (600 Juliana Street) constructed in 1836 by Peter Van Winkle (no relation to Rip I hear). The Wood County Courthouse built in 1899 is another classic building.

Seniors Also Like Historical State Parks

Several museums well worth a visit include The Blennerhassett Museum of Regional History, the  Henry Cooper House, the Oil and Gas Museum, the Sumnerite African-American History Museum, The Artcraft Studio and the Veterans Museum of Mid-Ohio Valley.

The Blennerhassett Island Historical State Park, the Henderson Hall Plantation, and the outdoor recreation at North Bend State Park & Rail Trail add to the attractiveness of the entire area. Lonely Planet notes that Fort Boreman is a Civil War fortification overlooking the city of Parkersburg and offers senior visitors some beautiful views of the city and the river.

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TripAdvisor suggests adding the Smoot Theater to your bucket list visit. I’d have to go check out the Dew Drop Inn, a local bar, just because I like that name. I think that my wife would search out a good B&B and the Log House Homestead might well serve our needs. The structure, architecture and furnishings are of the 1820’s with all the amenities of today.

I conclude today with a folksy-type video visit. It’s a little different. Hope you enjoyed it with your seatbelt attached. It’s really kinda cool, I think. -jeb

 

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